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 Post subject: Another 8x10 baby . . .
PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:33 am 
Of course, not quite as cute as Paul's 8x10 baby. I'm getting close to finishing this project. The back is non-standard of course, but works quite well. My first 8x10 homebuilt used a similar system. You pull the ground glass out as you would with a german plate camera. The material used to flock the channels is the fuzzy side of sticky-backed Velcro. It doesn't shed and it's tough as nails. I just finished up an 8x10 to 4x5 reducing back, which originally belonged to an B&J 8x10. An amazingly close match. This camera line was considered at one time to be the lightest camera in the world (in advertising). The camera weighs 3 lbs 8 oz. Add the ground glass and lens and it's still only 5 lbs 6 oz. Compare those numbers to my old Burke & James 4x5 which weighs over 7 lbs without a lens or ground glass installed. Anthony & Scovill Champion, Variation 3 (c. 1900 - 1906)

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 11:22 am 
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The Lone Rangefinder
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Mmm pretty!

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 11:48 am 
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Film Shooter
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This is a beauty. Apart from the woodwork I like the bellows, looks shiny like new. The construction seems to be very simplistic, which means: back to the roots and forget about hours of getting the last tiny movement perfect. Great landscape camera I guess...

Have fun with it,
rené

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:05 pm 
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A Strobist
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Really nice looking setup there, I am appreciating this kind of thing even more now since I have been shooting 4x5 lately. They are such nice cameras to use and you definitely feel unrestricted in what you can do with them when movements come into it.

Enjoy it :)

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2008 11:38 pm 
René_P wrote:
. . . Apart from the woodwork I like the bellows, looks shiny like new. . . .


I believe it is the original bellows. The outside layer is a red coarse weave material spray coated with a black resin. I just resprayed it black to hold the dried out resin together. This bellows has more leaks than a spaghetti strainer, but it functions.


lazarus219 wrote:
Really nice looking setup there, I am appreciating this kind of thing even more now since I have been shooting 4x5 lately. They are such nice cameras to use and you definitely feel unrestricted in what you can do with them when movements come into it.

Enjoy it :)


I consider the 4x5 the "sweet spot" in the formats. For numerous reasons . . . film availability, ease at enlarging, ease of developing, reasonable darkroom equipment costs, availability and variety of cameras and their physical size / weight. For me the last factor is very important.

This camera has only the minimum amount of movement. A little front rise & front fall and just a tad of rear tilt, and that's all. All of these movements come at a cost though . . . a lightweight camera. As of yesterday I was able to restore the back with a thinner ground glass resembling something that might be original. The entire camera with a lens and ground glass now weights only 4 lbs. 10 oz. Anyone that has hauled an 8x10 around knows the importants of the weight factor.

Below I have included a scan from the first 8x10 contact print from a negative by this camera. The camera to gas meter distance was approximately eight feet. The second scan was to show the grain structure around the middle screw area in the print.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 1:45 am 
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A Strobist
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I'm actually very tempted by a 4x5 at the moment but think I will wait a while because for now I could spend my money on a lot more useful things and don't think I would currently get all that much use out of it. Maybe next year.

I thought your new camera looked to have fairly minimal movements, the weight must be nice when your used to much heavier cameras though.

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