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Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.
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Author:  dwayne [ Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:26 pm ]
Post subject:  Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

Hi all,

I want to develop B&W film at home.

I will be using Ilford film.

Anyone have primmer on what materials i should buy and chemicals?

Thanks in advance.

Author:  Netsoft2k [ Tue Dec 06, 2011 11:59 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

This ought to keep you busy :)

viewtopic.php?t=15962

Author:  dwayne [ Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:48 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

O man this is a good thread ... Thanks

Author:  Claphoto [ Thu Dec 08, 2011 10:10 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

Go get some Diafine... look it up on Google

Author:  X. Phot. [ Thu Mar 29, 2012 12:17 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

So dwayne, how did your film developing progress?

Author:  walter23 [ Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:08 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

dwayne wrote:
Hi all,

I want to develop B&W film at home.

I will be using Ilford film.

Anyone have primmer on what materials i should buy and chemicals?

Thanks in advance.


I found this helpful.

http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php

Ilford ID-11 is a good standard developer to try, but you have to mix it in fairly large batches (powder to make up 1L of concentrated solution is the minimum size you can buy, which ends up making about 4 liters of working developer after dilution if I recall right).

Kodak HC-110 is great because it comes in a small bottle as liquid concentrate, so you can measure it out in small batches rather than mixing up a whole jug. I found that for some films it gave a higher contrast than ID-11, but you can experiment. Likely you won't care too much at first. You need a syringe to measure HC-110 accurately, since it is quite thick and to make enough for a small batch of film you only need a tiny amount of concentrate, like 4 or 5 milliliters - too little to measure with a grad cylinder or measuring cup. I bought a big thick syringe (without needle), about 10 ml size I think, from the drug store for this purpose.

Besides developer you need fixer and, optionally, stop bath. Stop bath is not strictly needed for film, if you halt development with a thorough water rinse, but you should fix it quickly afterwards. Stop bath is a good idea to be as accurate as possible with development time and avoid streaking from incomplete washing (and helps get the pH down, which makes your fixer last longer if you are planning to re-use it for a couple of film batches), but it is not strictly needed and I have omitted it many times. Just make sure you fix quickly afterwards.

If you are shooting 35mm, you need at minimum some measuring equipment (glass measuring cup or even better graduated cylinder(s)), some jugs to store the solution in like these (no idea on recommendation of this seller, just the first link I found):

http://www.cameramartusa.com/cpmdelta-d ... -5200.html

And a reel / container to hold the film and do the developing itself. Lots of different systems are in use for this one but most common is a stainless steel container w/ metal reel. Plastic versions are also available and work fine. You'll need to practice loading the reel and this can be pretty tricky (I shot a lot of film formats from large format sheet film to 35mm and 35mm film was the hardest to work with because it is so thin and long). Use some destroyed film for this purpose (sacrifice an expired old colour roll or something if you must).

Most reels let you work in the light (they have a light trap that lets you pour solution in and out without turning out the lights), but you still have to load the reel in the dark. A dark closet works for this, as does a bathroom. Just make sure no light is spilling around the doors, etc. Best to let your eyes adjust for a few minutes to make sure the room really is as dark as you think. I've started working in what seems to be pitch blackness only to find to my horror that after a minute or so, once my eyes adjusted, that I can see a lot of light pouring in from somewhere...

Make sure you can load the reel perfectly in the dark. Make sure you can load the reel perfectly in the dark. Make sure you can load the reel perfectly in the dark. Is that clear enough? Make sure you can load the reel perfectly in the dark. My first time loading a film reel was a disaster and I ended up after about an hour getting frustrated and throwing the crumples mess of film, without reel, straight into the developing tank to flop around loosely. It did not go well for the film ;)

Otherwise the process is simple and you can find many descriptions online with a bit of googling.

Author:  John [ Fri Mar 30, 2012 5:41 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

The easiest system I found is the Patterson Acu range.

Acutol developer, Acustop stop bath, Acufix fixer. It's liquid concentrate, easy to mix and use.

Author:  Eric Rose [ Sun Apr 01, 2012 7:28 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help ... I want to develop B&W film at home.

Check out www.apug.org this is the Analog Photographers Users Group. Anything you could ever want to know about analog they can help you with.

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